Jaishankar – The New Indian Express

By Agencies

MUMBAI: External Affairs Minister S Jaishankar said on Friday that the main conspirators and planners of the 26/11 terrorist attacks in Mumbai continue to remain protected and unpunished, which has undermined collective credibility.

He also said that when it comes to outlawing certain terrorists, the United Nations Security Council (UNSC) has “unfortunately” been unable to act in some cases due to “political considerations”.

The minister was speaking at a special meeting here on “countering the use of new and emerging technologies for terrorist purposes”.

The first leg of the event is taking place at the Taj Mahal Palace Hotel in South Mumbai.

This hotel was one of the places attacked by terrorists during the November 2008 attacks.

“The main conspirators and planners of the 26/11 terrorist attacks continue to remain protected and unpunished,” Jaishankar said. This undermines collective credibility and collective interest, he added.

Jaishankar said the “shocking” terrorist attack was not just an attack on Mumbai, but on the international community.

“In fact, this whole city was taken hostage by terrorists, who entered from the other side of the border,” he said, without naming Pakistan. As many as 140 Indian nationals and 26 citizens from 23 countries lost their lives in the attacks, he said.

On November 26, 2008, 10 terrorists trained by the Pakistani terrorist organization Lashkar-e-Tayyiba (LeT) carried out a series of coordinated attacks against multiple targets in Mumbai, killing 166 people.

Speaking at the Counter Terrorism Committee’s informal briefing, Jaishankar said, “We all know that money is the lifeblood of terrorism. Terrorist organizations need funds and resources to maintain their organizational functions and undertake activities. The reality that terrorism continues to exist and expand highlights an underlying truth: terrorism continues to obtain the financial resources necessary to thrive. »

“A key aspect of the fight against terrorism is to effectively combat the financing of terrorism. Today, the Counter-Terrorism Committee will also hear from experts on the fight against the financing of terrorism in the local and regional context”, said he declared.

Asking the international community to remember the trauma suffered by the victims of the Mumbai terrorist attacks, EAM said: “Your presence here demonstrates the commitment that each of you and your countries and all other stakeholders of various organizations have shown to counter the common threat of terrorism.”

Jaishanakar said that terrorism is a serious threat to international peace and security, in fact, to all of humanity. “We heard the voices of his victims today. Their loss is immeasurable,” he added, referring to the victim’s accounts that were heard ahead of his speech.

The Minister of Foreign Affairs stressed the need to remember the trauma of the victims of the Mumbai attacks in order to bring the perpetrators of terrorism to justice.

“However, it behooves us as responsible members of the international community to remember this trauma and to persevere in our efforts to bring the perpetrators of terrorism to justice. We owe it to all victims of terrorism around the world. “, he added.

Jaishankar, Michael Moussa, Gabonese Minister of Foreign Affairs and President of the UNSC, as well as members of the international community, also paid tribute to the victims who lost their lives in the terrorist attacks of 26/11.

(With PTI and ANI inputs)

MUMBAI: External Affairs Minister S Jaishankar said on Friday that the main conspirators and planners of the 26/11 terrorist attacks in Mumbai continue to remain protected and unpunished, which has undermined collective credibility. He also said that when it comes to outlawing certain terrorists, the United Nations Security Council (UNSC) has “unfortunately” been unable to act in some cases due to “political considerations”. The minister was speaking at a special meeting here on “countering the use of new and emerging technologies for terrorist purposes”. The first leg of the event is taking place at the Taj Mahal Palace Hotel in South Mumbai. This hotel was one of the locations attacked by terrorists in the November 2008 attacks. “The main conspirators and planners of the 26/11 terrorist attacks continue to remain protected and unpunished,” Jaishankar said. This undermines collective credibility and collective interest, he added. Jaishankar said the “shocking” terrorist attack was not just an attack on Mumbai, but on the international community. “In fact, this whole city was taken hostage by terrorists, who entered from the other side of the border,” he said, without naming Pakistan. As many as 140 Indian nationals and 26 citizens from 23 countries lost their lives in the attacks, he said. On November 26, 2008, 10 terrorists trained by the Pakistani terrorist organization Lashkar-e-Tayyiba (LeT) carried out a series of coordinated attacks against multiple targets in Mumbai, killing 166 people. Speaking at the Counter Terrorism Committee’s informal briefing, Jaishankar said, “We all know that money is the lifeblood of terrorism. Terrorist organizations need funds and resources to maintain their organizational functions and undertake activities. The reality that terrorism continues to exist and expand highlights an underlying truth: terrorism continues to obtain the financial resources necessary to thrive. “A key aspect of the fight against terrorism is to effectively combat the financing of terrorism. Today, the Counter-Terrorism Committee will also hear from experts on the fight against the financing of terrorism in the local and regional context”, did he declare. Asking the international community to remember the trauma suffered by the victims of the Mumbai terrorist attacks, EAM said: “Your presence here demonstrates the commitment that each of you and your countries and all other stakeholders of various organizations have shown to counter the common threat of terrorism.” Jaishanakar said that terrorism is a serious threat to international peace and security, in fact, to all of humanity. “We heard the voices of his victims today. Their loss is immeasurable,” he added, referring to the victim’s accounts that were heard ahead of his speech. The Minister of Foreign Affairs stressed the need to remember the trauma of the victims of the Mumbai attacks in order to bring the perpetrators of terrorism to justice. “However, it behooves us as responsible members of the international community to remember this trauma and to persevere in our efforts to bring the perpetrators of terrorism to justice. We owe it to all victims of terrorism around the world. “, he added. Jaishankar, Michael Moussa, Gabonese Minister of Foreign Affairs and President of the UNSC, as well as members of the international community, also paid tribute to the victims who lost their lives in the terrorist attacks of 26/11. (With PTI and ANI inputs)

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